Archive for the ‘World War II’ Tag

Golden Age of Television 1930's through 1950's   2 comments

 

1936
First television broadcast made available in London.

 

It was in the years immediately preceding WWII that the television industry we know today was born. RCA‘s David Sarnoff used his company’s exhibit at the 1939 World’s Fair as a showcase for the 1st Presidential speech on television and to introduce RCA’s new line of television receivers – some of which had to be coupled with a radio if you wanted to hear sound. In addition, anybody visiting the Fair could go into the RCA pavilion and step before the cameras themselves.

The excitement about television generated by the 1939 World’s Fair carried the interest in television through WWII when development of the medium took a back seat. By the time the war was over the electronic system of television had clearly proven its greater capacity and a period of intense growth took place. Between 1945 and 1948 the number of commercial (as opposed to experimental) television stations grew from 9 to 48 and the number of cities having commercial service went from 8 to 23. And, sales of television sets increased 500%. By 1960 there were 440 commercial VHF stations, 75 UHF stations, and 85% of U.S. households had a television set.

 


 

 

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in inventions

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German president marks former leader's Warsaw ghetto tribute < German news | Expatica Germany   Leave a comment

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising- Photo from Jürgen Stro...
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German President Christian Wulff on Tuesday honoured Jews who fought and died in the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising against the Nazis, 40 years after a landmark tribute by his nation’s chancellor Willy Brandt.

Wulff and Polish opposite number Bronislaw Komorowski laid wreaths at the Warsaw monument inaugurated in 1948 where the doomed Jewish fighters had made their last stand.

During a visit to Poland on December 7, 1970, Brandt fell to his knees at the same monument.

“I was 11 years old, but I was deeply marked by Willy Brandt’s great gesture, a sign of remorse, sadness and shame in the face of the huge suffering inflicted by Germans on eastern Europe,” Wulff said earlier during a meeting with young Poles.

Besides being seen as a plea for forgiveness for World War II, Brandt’s gesture also came to symbolise his drive to rebuild ties with eastern Europe, which earned him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1971.

via German president marks former leader’s Warsaw ghetto tribute < German news | Expatica Germany.

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Power Line – Investigate this   Leave a comment

O'ahu - Honolulu - Pearl Harbor: USS Missouri ...
Image by wallyg via Flickr

 

 

 

In my thirty years as a professor in upper education, I have never witnessed nor participated in a more extremist, agenda-driven, revisionist conference, nearly devoid of rhetorical balance and historical context for the arguments presented.

 

In both the required preparatory readings for the conference, as well as the scholarly presentations, I found the overriding messages to include the following:

1. The U.S. military and its veterans constitute an imperialistic, oppressive force which has created and perpetuated its own mythology of liberation and heroism, insisting on a “pristine collective memory” of the war. The authors/presenters equate this to Japan‘s almost total amnesia and denial about its own war atrocities (Fujitani, White, Yoneyama, 9, 23). One presenter specifically wrote about turning down a job offer when he realized that his office would overlook a fleet of U.S. Naval warships, “the symbol of American power and the symbol of our [Hawaiians‘] dispossession…I decided they could not pay me enough” (Osorio 5). Later he claimed that electric and oil companies were at the root of WWII, and that the U.S. developed a naval base at Pearl Harbor to ensure that its own coasts would not be attacked (9, 13).

via Power Line – Investigate this.

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Posted November 17, 2010 by dmacc502 in History, politics

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Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent   2 comments

Catacombs of Paris 01

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Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

via Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

via Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

Cataphiles are Parisian urban explorers who illegally wander the Catacombs, a term popularly used to describe a vast network of underground galleries, tunnels and crypts under Paris. Originally built after the French Revolution to house the remains of destroyed tombs during the expansion of the city, the Catacombs are testimony to over two centuries of the city’s historical heritage. For example, they were used as shelters by the French resistance during the Nazi occupation of Paris in the Second World War.

 

Beginning in the late Sixties, Parisians known as Cataphiles began restoring some of these spaces, and organising ossuaries to make way for more innovative creative spaces or themed neighbourhoods.

The Catacombs (or les k’tas as they are known locally) were formerly a network of stone mines. Nearly 80 yards below the city’s cobblestones, there are no lights, electricity or even sound. There are no living creatures or fantastic urban legends in the Catacombs; however, it is estimated that as many as 300 Parisians visit the Catacombs weekly, entering via secret entrances throughout the city. Visiting them is illegal and considered trespassing, although it is mostly tolerated by locals. If caught, trespassers face a small fine.

Japan and the Holocaust: Denver Post   Leave a comment

The young man’s monochrome portrait is at least 70 years old, the whites all faded to yellow, but it is still clear he had style. His hair is slicked down, eye arched, suit perfect with matching tie and handkerchief.

He also had the good fortune to escape Europe in the early days of World War II. The photo, a gift to the man who helped him escape, is one of seven recently discovered snapshots that cast light on a little known subplot of the war – even as Germany sought to seal Jewish Europeans in, a small army of tourism officials from its main ally, Japan, helped shepherd thousands away to safety.

“My best regards to my friend Tatsuo Osako,” is scrawled in French on the back of the picture, which is signed “I. Segaloff” and dated March 4, 1941. His fate is unknown.

An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. The photos were found in an old diary owned by Osako, who was a young employee of the Japan Tourist Bureau at the time, and died in 2003. Akira Kitade, who worked under Osako and is researching a book about him, has contacted Israeli officials for help and visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum said he gave it about 30 photographs that he is trying to identify, and received a list of over 2,000 Jews who received travel papers that enabled them to reach Japan.

Nissim Ben Shitrit, the Israeli ambassador to Japan, says he has passed on the information to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, which tracks and honors victims of the
Holocaust, and is optimistic some of the individuals can be tracked down. “I thought that we discovered almost everything about the horror of the Holocaust,”
Shitrit said. “And yet there is more to discover.”

The photos shed further light on the story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania who granted transit visas to several thousand Jews in the early days of the war. In doing so, he defied strict stipulations from Tokyo that such recipients have proper funds and a clear final destination after Japan.

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

1

This undated photo found in a diary owned by Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade who worked under Osako, shows Osako with a woman on a ship. The photo is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

2

This undated photo given to Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako shows a woman and a brief message written on the back. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

3

An old photo shows a woman and a brief message written on the back of the picture. An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

4

This undated photo given to Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade who worked under Osako, shows a woman and a brief message written on the back of the picture. The message written in French translates as, “With warm regards,” and signed “Marie.” (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

5

An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. The photos were found in an old diary owned by Osako, who was a young employee of the Japan Tourist Bureau at the time, and died in 2003. Akira Kitade, who worked under Osako and is researching a book about him, has contacted Israeli officials for help and visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum said he gave it about 30 photographs that he is trying to identify, and received a list of over 2,000 Jews who received travel papers that enabled them to reach Japan. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

6

This photo is one of seven recently discovered snapshots that cast light on a little known subplot of the war – even as Germany sought to seal Jewish Europeans in, a small army of tourism officials from its main ally, Japan, helped shepherd thousands away to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

7

The message written in Polish translates as, “A souvenir to a very nice Japanese man,” and signed what looks to be “Rozla.” The photograph is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

8

The note written in French translates as, “My best regards to my friend Tatsuo Osako,” signed “I. Segaloff” and dated March 4, 1941. The photograph is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

9

This undated photo kept in a diary owned by Tatsuo Osako of the Japan Tourist Bureau and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade, shows Osako. This photo was in the diary with seven photos given to him by people whom Osako helped escape from Europe in the early days of World War II. The recently discovered group of prints throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

10

The photos shed further light on the story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania who granted transit visas to several thousand Jews in the early days of the war. In doing so, he defied strict stipulations from Tokyo that such recipients have proper funds and a clear final destination after Japan. Photo courtesy Chiune Sugihara web site

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/

Posted October 20, 2010 by dmacc502 in culture, government, History

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