Archive for the ‘Japan’ Tag

Power Line – Investigate this   Leave a comment

O'ahu - Honolulu - Pearl Harbor: USS Missouri ...
Image by wallyg via Flickr

 

 

 

In my thirty years as a professor in upper education, I have never witnessed nor participated in a more extremist, agenda-driven, revisionist conference, nearly devoid of rhetorical balance and historical context for the arguments presented.

 

In both the required preparatory readings for the conference, as well as the scholarly presentations, I found the overriding messages to include the following:

1. The U.S. military and its veterans constitute an imperialistic, oppressive force which has created and perpetuated its own mythology of liberation and heroism, insisting on a “pristine collective memory” of the war. The authors/presenters equate this to Japan‘s almost total amnesia and denial about its own war atrocities (Fujitani, White, Yoneyama, 9, 23). One presenter specifically wrote about turning down a job offer when he realized that his office would overlook a fleet of U.S. Naval warships, “the symbol of American power and the symbol of our [Hawaiians‘] dispossession…I decided they could not pay me enough” (Osorio 5). Later he claimed that electric and oil companies were at the root of WWII, and that the U.S. developed a naval base at Pearl Harbor to ensure that its own coasts would not be attacked (9, 13).

via Power Line – Investigate this.

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Posted November 17, 2010 by dmacc502 in History, politics

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Japan and the Holocaust: Denver Post   Leave a comment

The young man’s monochrome portrait is at least 70 years old, the whites all faded to yellow, but it is still clear he had style. His hair is slicked down, eye arched, suit perfect with matching tie and handkerchief.

He also had the good fortune to escape Europe in the early days of World War II. The photo, a gift to the man who helped him escape, is one of seven recently discovered snapshots that cast light on a little known subplot of the war – even as Germany sought to seal Jewish Europeans in, a small army of tourism officials from its main ally, Japan, helped shepherd thousands away to safety.

“My best regards to my friend Tatsuo Osako,” is scrawled in French on the back of the picture, which is signed “I. Segaloff” and dated March 4, 1941. His fate is unknown.

An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. The photos were found in an old diary owned by Osako, who was a young employee of the Japan Tourist Bureau at the time, and died in 2003. Akira Kitade, who worked under Osako and is researching a book about him, has contacted Israeli officials for help and visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum said he gave it about 30 photographs that he is trying to identify, and received a list of over 2,000 Jews who received travel papers that enabled them to reach Japan.

Nissim Ben Shitrit, the Israeli ambassador to Japan, says he has passed on the information to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, which tracks and honors victims of the
Holocaust, and is optimistic some of the individuals can be tracked down. “I thought that we discovered almost everything about the horror of the Holocaust,”
Shitrit said. “And yet there is more to discover.”

The photos shed further light on the story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania who granted transit visas to several thousand Jews in the early days of the war. In doing so, he defied strict stipulations from Tokyo that such recipients have proper funds and a clear final destination after Japan.

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

1

This undated photo found in a diary owned by Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade who worked under Osako, shows Osako with a woman on a ship. The photo is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

2

This undated photo given to Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako shows a woman and a brief message written on the back. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

3

An old photo shows a woman and a brief message written on the back of the picture. An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

4

This undated photo given to Japanese tourism official Tatsuo Osako and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade who worked under Osako, shows a woman and a brief message written on the back of the picture. The message written in French translates as, “With warm regards,” and signed “Marie.” (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

5

An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. The photos were found in an old diary owned by Osako, who was a young employee of the Japan Tourist Bureau at the time, and died in 2003. Akira Kitade, who worked under Osako and is researching a book about him, has contacted Israeli officials for help and visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum said he gave it about 30 photographs that he is trying to identify, and received a list of over 2,000 Jews who received travel papers that enabled them to reach Japan. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

6

This photo is one of seven recently discovered snapshots that cast light on a little known subplot of the war – even as Germany sought to seal Jewish Europeans in, a small army of tourism officials from its main ally, Japan, helped shepherd thousands away to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

7

The message written in Polish translates as, “A souvenir to a very nice Japanese man,” and signed what looks to be “Rozla.” The photograph is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

8

The note written in French translates as, “My best regards to my friend Tatsuo Osako,” signed “I. Segaloff” and dated March 4, 1941. The photograph is part of a recently discovered group of prints which throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

9

This undated photo kept in a diary owned by Tatsuo Osako of the Japan Tourist Bureau and released on July 26, 2010 by Akira Kitade, shows Osako. This photo was in the diary with seven photos given to him by people whom Osako helped escape from Europe in the early days of World War II. The recently discovered group of prints throws more light on a subplot of the Holocaust: the small army of Japanese bureaucrats who helped shepherd thousands of Jews to safety. (AP Photo/Tatsuo Osako)

In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust

10

The photos shed further light on the story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania who granted transit visas to several thousand Jews in the early days of the war. In doing so, he defied strict stipulations from Tokyo that such recipients have proper funds and a clear final destination after Japan. Photo courtesy Chiune Sugihara web site

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/

Posted October 20, 2010 by dmacc502 in culture, government, History

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