Archive for the ‘French Revolution’ Tag

Biography – Nostradamus.org   Leave a comment

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Nostradamus, (December 14, 1503 – July 1, 1566) born Michel de Nostredame, is one of the world’s most famous authors of prophecies. He is most famous for his book Les Propheties, which consists of rhymed quatrains (4-line poems) grouped into sets of 100, called Centuries.

Nostradamus enthusiasts have credited him with predicting a copious number of events in world history, including the French Revolution, the atom bomb, the rise of Adolf Hitler and the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Detractors, however, see such predictions as examples of vaticinium ex eventu, retroactive clairvoyance and selective thinking, which find non-existent patterns in ambiguous statements. Because of this, it has been claimed that Nostradamus is “100% accurate at predicting events after they happen”.

Contents

1 Biography

2 Preparation and methods of prophecy

3 His works

4 Skepticism

5 Misquotes and Hoaxes

6 Nostradamus in popular culture

6.1 Television

6.2 Film

6.3 Music

6.4 Comics

7 Sources

8 External links

via Biography – Nostradamus.org.

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Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent   2 comments

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Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

via Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

via Going underground: Exploring the Paris Catacombs – Europe, World – The Independent.

Cataphiles are Parisian urban explorers who illegally wander the Catacombs, a term popularly used to describe a vast network of underground galleries, tunnels and crypts under Paris. Originally built after the French Revolution to house the remains of destroyed tombs during the expansion of the city, the Catacombs are testimony to over two centuries of the city’s historical heritage. For example, they were used as shelters by the French resistance during the Nazi occupation of Paris in the Second World War.

 

Beginning in the late Sixties, Parisians known as Cataphiles began restoring some of these spaces, and organising ossuaries to make way for more innovative creative spaces or themed neighbourhoods.

The Catacombs (or les k’tas as they are known locally) were formerly a network of stone mines. Nearly 80 yards below the city’s cobblestones, there are no lights, electricity or even sound. There are no living creatures or fantastic urban legends in the Catacombs; however, it is estimated that as many as 300 Parisians visit the Catacombs weekly, entering via secret entrances throughout the city. Visiting them is illegal and considered trespassing, although it is mostly tolerated by locals. If caught, trespassers face a small fine.