Archive for the ‘19th century’ Tag

After keeping us waiting for a century, Mark Twain will finally reveal all – News, Books – The Independent   Leave a comment

 

A promotional flyer for Adventures of Hucklebe...

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After keeping us waiting for a century, Mark Twain will finally reveal all – News, Books – The Independent.

via After keeping us waiting for a century, Mark Twain will finally reveal all – News, Books – The Independent.

Exactly a century after rumours of his death turned out to be entirely accurate, one of Mark Twain’s dying wishes is at last coming true: an extensive, outspoken and revelatory autobiography which he devoted the last decade of his life to writing is finally going to be published.

The creator of Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and some of the most frequently misquoted catchphrases in the English language left behind 5,000 unedited pages of memoirs when he died in 1910, together with handwritten notes saying that he did not want them to hit bookshops for at least a century.

That milestone has now been reached, and in November the University of California, Berkeley, where the manuscript is in a vault, will release the first volume of Mark Twain’s autobiography. The eventual trilogy will run to half a million words, and shed new light on the quintessentially American novelist.

Visible in stone: women’s history through the buildings they lived and worked in   Leave a comment

 

"When I was a servant in Rosemary Lane......

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For most of the Victorian period, working class women were rarely able to take advantage of education. By the late 19th century however, schools were spreading, and there were even vocational centres which trained girls for domestic service. This is a turn-of-the-century laundry class at the Housewifery Centre in Greenwich.

Picture: The Women’s Library.
 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatpicturegalleries/8036921/Visible-in-stone-womens-history-through-the-buildings-they-lived-and-worked-in.html?image=1

 

Posted October 17, 2010 by dmacc502 in culture, economy, global, history

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