Pioneers   Leave a comment

Nebraska pioneer family in front of sod house with cow on roof, 1886

Nebraska pioneer family, 1886

Although the pioneers traveled to the frontier for many different reasons, they all wanted an opportunity to start new lives.  Many of the pioneers were farmers.  They went to Oregon, Texas, and other areas of the frontier for the inexpensive or even possibly free land. This land was available forhomesteading.  They wanted the rich, fertile land for their crops.  Other people came to the frontier because they had heard stories that made the new lands sound like magical places.  Some went to the frontier in order to prospect for gold, to hunt and trade fur pelts, and for many other reasons

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in farming, History

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Vietnam   Leave a comment

The Vietnam War: An Overview

The Second Indochina War, 1954-1975, grew out of the long conflict between France and Vietnam. In July 1954, after one hundred years of colonial rule, France was forced to leave Vietnam. Communist forces under the direction of General Vo Nguyen Giap defeated the allied French troops at Dien Bien Phu, a remote mountain outpost in the northwest corner of Vietnam. This decisive battle convinced the French that they could no longer maintain their Indochinese colonies and Paris quickly sued for peace. As the two sides came together to discuss the terms of the peace in Geneva, Switzerland, international events were already shaping the future of Indochina.

 

On August 2, 1964, in response to American and South Vietnamese espionage along itsBattleship firing its main guns. Photo courtesy of Soc.History.War. Vietnam Home Pagecoast, North Vietnam launched a local and controlled attack against an American ship on call in the Gulf of Tonkin. A second attack was supposed to have taken place on August 4, although Vo Nguyen Giap the DRV’s leading military figure at the time and Johnson’s Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara have recently concluded that no second attack ever took place. In any event, the Johnson administration used the August 4 attack to secure a Congressional resolution that gave the president broad war powers. The resolution, now known as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, passed both the House and Senate with only two dissenting votes (Senators Morse of Oregon and Gruening of Alaska). The Resolution was followed by limited reprisal air attacks against North Vietnam.

 

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in History, war

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Lindbergh Kidnapping   1 comment

Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Image via Wikipedia

The kidnapping of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., was the abduction of the son of aviator Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The toddler, 20 months old at the time, wasabducted from his family home in East Amwell, New Jersey, near the town of Hopewell, New Jersey, on the evening of March 1, 1932. Over two months later, on May 12, 1932, his body was discovered a short distance from the Lindberghs’ home.[1] A medical examination determined that the cause of death was a massive skull fracture.[2]

After an investigation that lasted more than two years, Bruno Richard Hauptmann was arrested and charged with the crime. In a trial that was held from January 2 to February 13, 1935, Hauptmann was found guilty of murder in the first degree and sentenced to death. He was executed by electric chair at the New Jersey State Prison on April 3, 1936, at 8:44 in the evening. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence to the end.[3]

Newspaper writer H. L. Mencken called the kidnapping and subsequent trial “the biggest story since the Resurrection“.[4] The crime spurred Congress to pass the Federal Kidnapping Act, commonly called the “Lindbergh Law”, which made transporting a kidnapping victim across state lines a federal crime.[5]

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in crime, History

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President John F. Kennedy   Leave a comment

John F. Kennedy was killed on November 22, 1963. Almost 30 years later, Congress enacted the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992. The Act mandated that all assassination-related material be housed in a single collection in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).

http://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/

President Kennedy was murdered at the height of the Cold War, just a year after the Cuban Missile Crisis brought the world to the brink of nuclear disaster. While the mythology of a lost Camelot developed in the years since his death, the Kennedy era was marked by a variety of tensions and crises. The civil rights movement gathered momentum in the early 1960s and clashed with resistance, particularly in the South. Kennedy’s brother Robert, as Attorney General, launched an unprecedented war on organized crime. Cuba was the most intense foreign policy hotspot – Castro had come to power there during the Eisenhower era and plots to overthrow andassassinate him continued in the Kennedy era. Vietnam was a simmering problem that would only bloom into full-scale war during the Johnson presidency.

Within hours of Oswald‘s murder, federal authorities including the powerful FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover moved to close the case. Others pushed for a blue-ribbon commission. Assistant Attorney General Katzenbach wrote a revealing memo which stated “The public must be satisfied that Oswald was the assassin; that he did not have confederates who are still at large; and that evidence was such that he would have been convicted at trial.” The memo also noted the rumors of a Communist conspiracy based on Oswald’s sojourn in Russia, but also noted: “Unfortunately the facts on Oswald seem about too pat–too obvious (Marxist, Cuba, Russian wife, etc.). The Dallas police have put out statements on the Communist conspiracy theory, and it was they who were in charge when he was shot and thus silenced


Fall of the Hindenburg   1 comment

FILE--This photo, taken during the initial exp...

Image via Wikipedia

ON MAY 6, 1937, the German airship Hindenburg burst into flames 200 feet over its intended landing spot at New Jersey’s Lakehurst Naval Air Station. Thirty-five people on board the flight were killed (13 passengers and 22 crewmen), along with one crewman on the ground.

The giant flying vessel measured 803.8 feet in length and weighed approximately 242 tons. Its mostly metal frame was filled with hydrogen. It came complete with numerous sleeping quarters, a library, dining room, and a magnificent lounge, but still managed a top speed of just over 80 miles per hour.

The zeppelin had just crossed the Atlantic Ocean after taking off from Frankfurt, Germany 2½ days prior on its first transatlantic voyage of the season. Thirty-six passengers and a crew of 61 were on board.

Read more: The Hindenburg Tragedy: May 6, 1937 http://www.infoplease.com/spot/hindenburg1.html#ixzz1FRV2CY1O

Read more: The Hindenburg Tragedy: May 6, 1937http://www.infoplease.com/spot/hindenburg1.html#ixzz1FRUaX4Jj

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in Air travel, History

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>Warren Buffett's letter to investors: Why the railroad is such a good investment. – By Annie Lowrey – Slate Magazine   1 comment

>Warren Buffett’s letter to investors: Why the railroad is such a good investment. – By Annie Lowrey – Slate Magazine

Warren Buffett. Click image to expand.
In 2010, with the U.S. economy still wounded and U.S. consumers still wary, cash-rich investors often looked west: All the big returns were in Singapore or Hong Kong or Silicon Valley, they said, so they put their money into hot social-media start-ups and emerging economies. But last year the world’s most famous investor decided to stay very close to his base in flyover country. Warren Buffett doubled down on a 19th-century technology that runs right through his Nebraska hometown: trains.

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in Uncategorized

>Betty White | Pioneering People | Pioneers of Television | PBS   Leave a comment

>

Photo of actress Betty White at the 41st Emmy ...Image via WikipediaBetty White | Pioneering People | Pioneers of Television | PBS

Betty WhiteComedian Betty White was one of the first women in television to garner creative control in front of the camera and behind when she starred in and co-produced the nationally syndicated situation comedy, “Life with Elizabeth.”
The comedy only lasted for a few seasons, but it resulted in White’s first Emmy® Award and fueled a long and successful career.

Posted March 1, 2011 by dmacc502 in Betty White, Comedian, Emmy Award, Television