Archive for the ‘U.S.’ Category

Women and Children First – NYTimes.com   1 comment

Historic photo of the Cape Hatteras Life-Savin...

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Off Cape Hatteras, Feb. 5, 1861

It had already been a long voyage. For almost two full days, the little steamer Marion had lain at anchor at the mouth of Charleston Harbor, waiting for the weather to clear. Winter rain spattered against the decks and landed, hissing, on the boilers’ iron flanks. Below, several dozen unhappy passengers huddled in the dimness, mothers consoling their wailing children or staggering over to the portholes to be sick.

But on Feb. 3 they had emerged resolutely above decks, despite the weather, as the steamer passed the high walls of the fortress where they were leaving behind their loved ones. There, silhouetted against the gray sky, were Fort Sumter’s defenders, their husbands and fathers. From atop the parapet of Sumter came three rounds of throaty cheers. The women and children, many choking back tears, bravely shouted three cheers in reply.

via Women and Children First – NYTimes.com.

Posted February 5, 2011 by dmacc502 in government, History, photography, politics, U.S.

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Captured: North American Indian Photographs by Edward Curtis   Leave a comment

In 1906, American photographer Edward S. Curtis was offered $75,000 to document North American Indians. The benefactor, J.P Morgan, was to receive 25 sets of the completed series of 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs entitled The North American Indian. Curtis set out to photograph the North American Indian way of life at a time when Native Americans were being forced from their land and stripped of their rights. Curtis’ photographs depicted a romantic version of the culture which ran contrary to the popular view of Native Americans as savages.

Born in 1868 in Wisconsin, Curtis moved with his father to the Washington territory in 1887 where he began working at a photography studio in the frontier city of Seattle. Curtis began work on his series in 1895 by photographing Princess Angeline, the daughter of Chief Sealth and published the first volume of The North American Indian in 1907. The last volume wasn’t published until 1930. In more than three decades of work documenting Native Americans, Curtis traveled from the Great Plains to the mountainous west, and from the Mexican border to western Canada to the Arctic Ocean in Alaska.

Below are selected images of the Native American way of life chosen from The Library of Congress’s Edward S. Curtis Collection. Some were published in The North American Indian but most were not published. All the captions are original to Edward Curtis.

 

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

1

Title: Sioux chiefs. Date Created/Published: c1905. Summary: Photograph shows three Native Americans on horseback. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

2

Title: Ready for the throw–Nunivak. Date Created/Published: c1929 February 28. Summary: Eskimo man seated in a kayak prepares to throw spear. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

3

Title: The mealing trough–Hopi. Date Created/Published: c1906. Summary: Four young Hopi Indian women grinding grain. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

4

Title: The scout in winter–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Apsaroke man on horseback on snow-covered ground, probably in Pryor Mountains, Montana. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

5

Title: At the old well of Acoma Date Created/Published: c1904 November 12. Summary: Acoma girl, seated on rock, watches as another girl fills a pottery vessel with water from a pool. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

6

Title: Mizheh and babe. Date Created/Published: c1906 December 19. Summary: Apache woman, at base of tree, holding infant in cradleboard in her lap. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

7

Title: On the Little Big Horn. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Horses wading in water next to a Crow tipi encampment. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

8

Title: When winter comes. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Dakota woman, carrying firewood in snow, approaches tipi. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

9

Title: A burial platform–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

10

Title: The Oath–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 November 19. Summary: Three Apsaroke men gazing skyward, two holding rifles, one with object skewered on arrow pointed skyward, bison skull at their feet. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

11

Title: Drilling ivory–King Island. Date Created/Published: c1929 February 28. Summary: Eskimo man, wearing hooded parka, manually drilling an ivory tusk. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

12

Title: Drying meat. Date Created/Published: c1908 November 19. Summary: Two Dakota women hanging meat to dry on poles, tent in background. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/11/15/north-american-indian-photographs-by-edward-curtis/2551/

 

Lt. George A. Custer   Leave a comment

George Armstrong Custer and Elizabeth Bacon Cu...

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Animals at War: ON WAR Blog

10

Lt. George A. Custer with dog. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, the Peninsular Campaign, May-August 1862. Selected Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 (Library of Congress)

Armistice Day: Nation falls silent to remember war dead: Britain   8 comments

A view of Whitehall, looking south, in 1740. T...

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Millions fell silent across Britain today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War. Photo: PA
10:55AM GMT 11 Nov 2010

The agreement between Germany and the Allies took effect at the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918 after four years of fighting.

As the nation stopped to remember those who died in battle, the Archbishop of Canterbury, defence ministers, representatives of military associations, veterans and school children attended a service at the Cenotaph in central London to commemorate Armistice Day.

Brother Nigel Cave, the Western Front Association’s padre, led the ceremony, and wreaths were laid at the monument in Whitehall

 

The Donner Party   1 comment

Donner Lake Pass in the Sierra Nevada Mountain...

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The Donner Party.

via The Donner Party.

The Donner Party was the most famous tragedy in the history of the westward migration.  Almost ninety wagon train emigrants were unable to cross the Sierra Nevada before winter, and almost one-half starved to death.  Perhaps because they were ordinary people — farmers, merchants, parents, children — their story captures the imagination.  The logs on this site contain the words of the participants from their diaries, letters and first-hand accounts, balanced by the perspective of later historians.  The logs describe the locations of their trail and camps in detail so you can follow in the Donner Party’s wagon tracks and footsteps.

 


One-hundred and sixty-four years ago this month, the Donner Party was unable to cross the Pass in a storm.  They returned to the Lake and built cabins, below.  They slaughtered their cattle for food, and used the hides as roofs on the cabins.  The Breens inhabited the cabin that had been built two years earlier by the Stephens Party. This is the site of the Pioneer Monument at Donner Memorial State Park. The Murphys built a cabin a few hundred yards to the south, against a large rock. This rock is today marked by a plaque in the Park.  The Graves and Reeds built a cabin about a half-mile down the Creek.

Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE   Leave a comment

The Jetson family (clockwise from upper left) ...

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Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE.  Click link for slideshow

via Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

When The Jetsons first aired in 1962, it predicted a world where creature comforts were all taken care of, menial tasks were minimal, and technology had conquered all but human ennui. But though George Jetson lived in the ridiculously far-off time of 2062, Americans enjoy many of their science-fiction-y gizmos today.

James Madison   Leave a comment

“A popular Government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives.”James MadisonFreedom of information act. Dept. of Defense. Most DoD components accept e-mail requests. A list of DoD component web pages may be found at:(http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/dfoipo/

Posted October 19, 2010 by dmacc502 in government, History, politics, U.S.

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Modern Day Slavery: The Chocolate Youre Eating Was Likely Made By Enslaved Children | | AlterNet   6 comments

Two girls protesting child labour (by calling ...

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Modern Day Slavery: The Chocolate Youre Eating Was Likely Made By Enslaved Children | | AlterNet.

via Modern Day Slavery: The Chocolate Youre Eating Was Likely Made By Enslaved Children | | AlterNet.

Sorry to scare you, but on Halloween much of the chocolate Americans will hand out to trick-or-treaters will be tainted by the labor of enslaved children.

Hershey’s, Nestlé, and the other big chocolate companies know this. They promised nearly a decade ago to set up a system to certify that no producers in their supply chains use child labor. They gave themselves a July 2005 deadline for that, which came and went without meaningful action. A second voluntary deadline sailed by as well in 2008. There’s a new deadline for voluntary action at the end of this year. Don’t hold your breath.

Few Americans had heard of this problem before reporters Sudarsan Raghavan and Sumana Chatterjee exposed the scandalous conditions under which most U.S. chocolate is made, in the summer of 2001.

In one of their articles, a slave described his 13-hour workdays on the 494-acre plantation as brutal, filled with harsh physical labor, punctuated by beatings, and ending with a night of fitful sleep on a wooden plank in a locked room with other slaves.

“The beatings were a part of my life,” said the boy who was sold into slavery at not yet 12 years old. “Anytime they loaded you with bags and you fell while you were carrying them, nobody helped you. Instead, they beat you and beat you until you picked it up again.”

The reports shocked some members of Congress into action. That fall, Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY) and Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) prepared bills to require U.S. chocolate companies — by force of law — to certify their products as slave-free. Engel’s bill passed the House, but before Harkin’s bill could pass the Senate, the chocolate industry had announced a voluntary four-year plan to clean up its own supply chains, without legislation.

Meanwhile evidence that child slavery still bedevils the chocolate industry isn’t hard to find. For example, in late September, a research team from Tulane University (specifically charged by Congress with oversight of the voluntary supply-chain efforts) reported that “the industry is still far from achieving its target…by the end of 2010…and the majority of children exposed to the worst forms of child labor remain unreached.”

The just-released documentary The Dark Side of Chocolate, by filmmakers Miki Mistrati and U. Roberto Romano takes a less detached tone, going undercover and exposing child slavery in the cocoa supply chain from the inside.

And if that’s not enough, the State Department‘s own2010 Trafficking in Personsreport lists several West African countries where children are traded and taken to work cocoa plantations.

All the while, the biggest chocolate companies cavil that because they don’t own the cocoa plantations outright, cleaning up their supply chains is too hard. But some of them aren’t even trying. The biggest cocoa company in the country, Hershey’s — even after nine years to get started — has no certification system in place whatsoever to ensure that its cocoa isn’t tainted by labor rights abuses.

 

Historic church bells toll once again in Lawrence – The Boston Globe   Leave a comment

The Star-Spangled Banner

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Historic church bells toll once again in Lawrence – The Boston Globe.

via Historic church bells toll once again in Lawrence – The Boston Globe.

The massive carillon in the belfry of St. Mary of the Assumption Parish, built 136 years ago to call parishioners to worship, had been still for a decade, the combination of accumulated pigeon droppings and lightning strikes.

Like many of his parishioners, Pastor Jorge Reyes yearned for the timbre of the 16 bronze bells, which were built by an apprentice of Paul Revere and for so long pealed for weddings and tolled for funerals, marking the church’s presence in the old mill city.

“It felt like something was missing,’’ Reyes said.

During the weekend, the pious music once again rang from the church’s Gothic-styled 225-foot-high tower on Hampshire Street and resounded throughout the community.

“It was beautiful,’’ said Reyes, who once rang the bells at the church he belonged to while growing up in Cuba. “Now, it feels complete — like a church is supposed to sound.’’

The new, high-tech system hooked up to the bells, which range in weight from more than 3,000 pounds to little more than 100 pounds, has given the church a broader repertoire. The bells now can play about 2,000 tunes, from traditional Catholic hymns such as “Ave Maria’’ and “Tantum Ergo Sacramentum’’ to more secular tunes, including “The Star-Spangled Banner’’ and “The Bells of Saint Mary’s,’’ from the 1945 film starring Bing Crosby and Ingrid Bergman.

When the system is programmed in the coming days, the bells will play “The Angelus’’ at least three times a day, at 6 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m., as well as before all Masses and at funerals and weddings.

“The bells are a hidden treasure we have in Lawrence,’’ said Mark J. Alaimo, chairman of the church’s finance council, adding that there are only seven Catholic churches nationwide with more than 16 bells. “They are heartwarming to hear and also serve as a form of evangelization.’’

The bells were made by William Blake and Co. of Boston, whom church officials say apprenticed for Revere, and were restored in recent weeks, after parishioners and an outside group raised $20,000 to repair the damage. Chime Master Systems of Ohio installed the computerized control system.

Much of the electrical work was done by former parishioner Tom Canney and his son, Aaron, both of whom made more than 100 trips up and down the steep staircase from the choir loft to the belfry. They ran more than 100 feet of piping and wires through the old tower housing nearly 15,000 pounds worth of bells, each of which has a Latin inscription dedicated to saints including Mary, Patrick, and Peter.

“I haven’t heard those bells ring since I was a child,’’ Canney said. “So it was really great to hear when we finished.’’

At Mass on Sunday, Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley rechristened the bells with a blessing. The ceremony helped pack the pews with an estimated 3,000 parishioners.

Among those in attendance was Mary Girouard, 80, a parishioner at St. Mary’s on and off since the 1970s. Many people were in tears as they heard the reverent music.

“It was just a thrill, like it was meant to be,’’ Girouard said. “It was a rejoicing peal.’’

Maria Santiago, 58, a parishioner for three decades, said her heart began to race when she heard the bells.

“It reminded me of when I was a little girl,’’ she said. “It was so nice; it was hard to keep your eyes dry.’’

David Abel can be reached at dabel@globe.com.

 

Posted October 19, 2010 by dmacc502 in construction, religion, U.S.

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Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge Prepares For Travelers : NPR   Leave a comment

Looking across water to dam, "Boulder (Ho...

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Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge Prepares For Travelers : NPR.

via Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge Prepares For Travelers : NPR.

via Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge Prepares For Travelers : NPR.

Officially named the Mike O’Callaghan-Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge, the 1,900-foot-long structure sits 890 feet above the Colorado River, about a quarter of a mile downstream from the Hoover Dam. The $240 million project to relieve vehicle traffic on the Hoover Dam began in 2003, and is scheduled to open to traffic sometime this week.

October 18, 2010

The Hoover Dam is an American landmark, perhaps the quintessential public works project, built during the Great Depression to provide power and irrigation to the West.

Now, the Hoover Dam has company: a new bypass bridge — another engineering marvel just downstream, spanning the Colorado River between Nevada and Arizona.

Mike O'Callaghan-Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge

Courtesy of Federal Highway AdministrationOnce open, the Mike O’Callaghan-Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge will be the shortest route between Phoenix and Las Vegas.

The bridge, almost 900 feet above the Colorado River, will open to traffic sometime this week. Highway officials are refraining from announcing the day to avoid a crush of vehicles trying to be the first to cross.

One of the highest bridges in the world, the Hoover Dam bypass bridge rises 726 feet above the bedrock. It has the longest single concrete arch in the Western Hemisphere — a semicircle that echoes the graceful curve of the dam upstream. The arch, curving downward on either side, supports the four-lane roadway on top. It took five years for it to literally come together, section by section from either side