Archive for the ‘U.S.’ Category

Women and Children First – NYTimes.com   1 comment

Historic photo of the Cape Hatteras Life-Savin...

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Off Cape Hatteras, Feb. 5, 1861

It had already been a long voyage. For almost two full days, the little steamer Marion had lain at anchor at the mouth of Charleston Harbor, waiting for the weather to clear. Winter rain spattered against the decks and landed, hissing, on the boilers’ iron flanks. Below, several dozen unhappy passengers huddled in the dimness, mothers consoling their wailing children or staggering over to the portholes to be sick.

But on Feb. 3 they had emerged resolutely above decks, despite the weather, as the steamer passed the high walls of the fortress where they were leaving behind their loved ones. There, silhouetted against the gray sky, were Fort Sumter’s defenders, their husbands and fathers. From atop the parapet of Sumter came three rounds of throaty cheers. The women and children, many choking back tears, bravely shouted three cheers in reply.

via Women and Children First – NYTimes.com.

Posted February 5, 2011 by dmacc502 in government, History, photography, politics, U.S.

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Captured: North American Indian Photographs by Edward Curtis   Leave a comment

In 1906, American photographer Edward S. Curtis was offered $75,000 to document North American Indians. The benefactor, J.P Morgan, was to receive 25 sets of the completed series of 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs entitled The North American Indian. Curtis set out to photograph the North American Indian way of life at a time when Native Americans were being forced from their land and stripped of their rights. Curtis’ photographs depicted a romantic version of the culture which ran contrary to the popular view of Native Americans as savages.

Born in 1868 in Wisconsin, Curtis moved with his father to the Washington territory in 1887 where he began working at a photography studio in the frontier city of Seattle. Curtis began work on his series in 1895 by photographing Princess Angeline, the daughter of Chief Sealth and published the first volume of The North American Indian in 1907. The last volume wasn’t published until 1930. In more than three decades of work documenting Native Americans, Curtis traveled from the Great Plains to the mountainous west, and from the Mexican border to western Canada to the Arctic Ocean in Alaska.

Below are selected images of the Native American way of life chosen from The Library of Congress’s Edward S. Curtis Collection. Some were published in The North American Indian but most were not published. All the captions are original to Edward Curtis.

 

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

1

Title: Sioux chiefs. Date Created/Published: c1905. Summary: Photograph shows three Native Americans on horseback. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

2

Title: Ready for the throw–Nunivak. Date Created/Published: c1929 February 28. Summary: Eskimo man seated in a kayak prepares to throw spear. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

3

Title: The mealing trough–Hopi. Date Created/Published: c1906. Summary: Four young Hopi Indian women grinding grain. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

4

Title: The scout in winter–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Apsaroke man on horseback on snow-covered ground, probably in Pryor Mountains, Montana. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

5

Title: At the old well of Acoma Date Created/Published: c1904 November 12. Summary: Acoma girl, seated on rock, watches as another girl fills a pottery vessel with water from a pool. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

6

Title: Mizheh and babe. Date Created/Published: c1906 December 19. Summary: Apache woman, at base of tree, holding infant in cradleboard in her lap. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

7

Title: On the Little Big Horn. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Horses wading in water next to a Crow tipi encampment. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

8

Title: When winter comes. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Summary: Dakota woman, carrying firewood in snow, approaches tipi. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

9

Title: A burial platform–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 July 6. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

10

Title: The Oath–Apsaroke. Date Created/Published: c1908 November 19. Summary: Three Apsaroke men gazing skyward, two holding rifles, one with object skewered on arrow pointed skyward, bison skull at their feet. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

11

Title: Drilling ivory–King Island. Date Created/Published: c1929 February 28. Summary: Eskimo man, wearing hooded parka, manually drilling an ivory tusk. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Captured: Edward Curtis Photographs

12

Title: Drying meat. Date Created/Published: c1908 November 19. Summary: Two Dakota women hanging meat to dry on poles, tent in background. Photograph by Edward S. Curtis, Curtis (Edward S.) Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/11/15/north-american-indian-photographs-by-edward-curtis/2551/

 

Lt. George A. Custer   Leave a comment

George Armstrong Custer and Elizabeth Bacon Cu...

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Animals at War: ON WAR Blog

10

Lt. George A. Custer with dog. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, the Peninsular Campaign, May-August 1862. Selected Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 (Library of Congress)

Armistice Day: Nation falls silent to remember war dead: Britain   8 comments

A view of Whitehall, looking south, in 1740. T...

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Millions fell silent across Britain today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War. Photo: PA
10:55AM GMT 11 Nov 2010

The agreement between Germany and the Allies took effect at the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918 after four years of fighting.

As the nation stopped to remember those who died in battle, the Archbishop of Canterbury, defence ministers, representatives of military associations, veterans and school children attended a service at the Cenotaph in central London to commemorate Armistice Day.

Brother Nigel Cave, the Western Front Association’s padre, led the ceremony, and wreaths were laid at the monument in Whitehall

 

The Donner Party   1 comment

Donner Lake Pass in the Sierra Nevada Mountain...

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The Donner Party.

via The Donner Party.

The Donner Party was the most famous tragedy in the history of the westward migration.  Almost ninety wagon train emigrants were unable to cross the Sierra Nevada before winter, and almost one-half starved to death.  Perhaps because they were ordinary people — farmers, merchants, parents, children — their story captures the imagination.  The logs on this site contain the words of the participants from their diaries, letters and first-hand accounts, balanced by the perspective of later historians.  The logs describe the locations of their trail and camps in detail so you can follow in the Donner Party’s wagon tracks and footsteps.

 


One-hundred and sixty-four years ago this month, the Donner Party was unable to cross the Pass in a storm.  They returned to the Lake and built cabins, below.  They slaughtered their cattle for food, and used the hides as roofs on the cabins.  The Breens inhabited the cabin that had been built two years earlier by the Stephens Party. This is the site of the Pioneer Monument at Donner Memorial State Park. The Murphys built a cabin a few hundred yards to the south, against a large rock. This rock is today marked by a plaque in the Park.  The Graves and Reeds built a cabin about a half-mile down the Creek.

Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE   Leave a comment

The Jetson family (clockwise from upper left) ...

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Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE.  Click link for slideshow

via Jetsons Gadgets That Came True – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

When The Jetsons first aired in 1962, it predicted a world where creature comforts were all taken care of, menial tasks were minimal, and technology had conquered all but human ennui. But though George Jetson lived in the ridiculously far-off time of 2062, Americans enjoy many of their science-fiction-y gizmos today.

James Madison   Leave a comment

“A popular Government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives.”James MadisonFreedom of information act. Dept. of Defense. Most DoD components accept e-mail requests. A list of DoD component web pages may be found at:(http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/dfoipo/

Posted October 19, 2010 by dmacc502 in government, History, politics, U.S.

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