Archive for the ‘London’ Category

Famous British Weddings: Slide Show : Discovery News   Leave a comment

West view of Westminster Abbey, London.
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Famous British Weddings: Slide Show : Discovery News.

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Armistice Day: Nation falls silent to remember war dead: Britain   8 comments

A view of Whitehall, looking south, in 1740. T...

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Millions fell silent across Britain today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War.

Millions across Britain fell silent today to mark the anniversary of the day peace returned to Europe at the end of the First World War. Photo: PA
10:55AM GMT 11 Nov 2010

The agreement between Germany and the Allies took effect at the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918 after four years of fighting.

As the nation stopped to remember those who died in battle, the Archbishop of Canterbury, defence ministers, representatives of military associations, veterans and school children attended a service at the Cenotaph in central London to commemorate Armistice Day.

Brother Nigel Cave, the Western Front Association’s padre, led the ceremony, and wreaths were laid at the monument in Whitehall

 

Records created and inherited by the Foreign Office nationalarchives.gov.uk   Leave a comment

Thermo-nuclear weapons: policy and research

This file contains Cabinet Office memos, letters and briefing papers charting the development of Britain’s policy on the use of nuclear weapons. Concerns are expressed about the ‘frightening nature and enormous power’ of this weapon and the effect it could have on ‘an uninformed and ignorant public’. ‘The free world must show that it is ready to retaliate immediately against any aggressor who starts global war‘, reads one memorandum. Another briefing paper uses the ‘pat formula’ that any attack on Britain would involve ’20 bombs on 20 cities causing 20 million deaths’, to which an official adds that we should expect ‘all of the seriously injured to die’.

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Million plus in Europe's 60s generation of ageing drug addicts, report finds | Society | The Guardian   Leave a comment

A injection kit used in harm reduction program...

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Million plus in Europe‘s 60s generation of ageing drug addicts, report finds | Society | The Guardian.

More older people than ever are experiencing problems with drug addiction. Photograph: Lester Lefkowitz/Corbis

Keith Richards and Ozzy Osbourne may now be clean, but there are a hidden generation of ageing heroin users in their 50s and 60s who have not been able to kick the habit.

The European drugs agency say there are more than a million problem drug users aged over 40 across the EU, including 122,000 in Britain, who dent the widely held perception that drug use is a youth phenomenon.

“In reality, more older people than ever are reporting experience with drugs at some point in their lives and drug problems have no age limits,” said the annual report of the European monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction, published today.

Posted November 11, 2010 by dmacc502 in global, History, London, medicine, Uncategorized

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Haunted houses: Got ghosts? A little daily exorcise should help – Telegraph   1 comment

Annesley Hall. A Grade II listed building and ...

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Haunted houses: Got ghosts? A little daily exorcise should help – Telegraph.

via Haunted houses: Got ghosts? A little daily exorcise should help – Telegraph.

he scene is a dark basement in an 18th-century town house, built on the site of an ancient monastery, within the walls of Berwick-upon-Tweed.

A couple is busy doing routine DIY tasks, when suddenly they put down their tools. A cacophony of banging is coming from upstairs. And that’s strange, because there’s no one else living in the house.

The Royal Ballet exhibition at The Lowry: The Telegraph   Leave a comment

Ninette de Valois

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Ninette de Valois' signed autograph card from the Lyceum 1914-16

The founder of the Royal Ballet, Ninette de Valois, as a child – signed autograph card from the Lyceum 1914-16

The Royal Opera House is working in partnership with the Lowry on a major new exhibition about the history of The Royal Ballet, which will be on display at The Lowry in Salford from 22 October. The exhibition will also look at Salford artist L.S.Lowry’s involvement with ballet and how his appreciation of art, music and dance affected his work. Some previously unseen drawings, thought to have been influenced by his love of ballet, will be included in the exhibition, which will be part of The Lowry’s tenth anniversary celebrations.

Ninette de Valois talking to dancers Maryon Lane and Annette Page during a rehearsal of Agon 1958

Ninette de Valois talking to dancers Maryon Lane and Annette Page during a rehearsal of Agon 1958

Picture: Roger Wood ROH Collection.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/8073

Country diary: Wenlock Edge | Environment | The Guardian   Leave a comment

Wenlock Edge and Wilderhope Manor, Shropshire

Image by UGArdener via Flickr. Wenlock Edge

Country diary: Wenlock Edge | Environment | The Guardian.

via Country diary: Wenlock Edge | Environment | The Guardian.

Robin in song on a branch, Photograph: Andrew Parkinson/ Andrew Parkinson/Corbis

The space is set for robins’ song. There’s an odd quiet which holds the texture of a cool breeze, soft light and a kind of absence. The swifts raced off weeks ago; now swallows and house martins have slipped away too. The warblers headed south for Africa and now the stay-at-homes rule the roost. But even they are moody.

A buzzard stirs around the sky letting out sharp mews, loosely aimed. Wood pigeons roll their fat little coos to each other in a tree above the old railway line, where lies the headless corpse of a sister who got in the way of a young peregrine testing her mettle. The long-tailed tits and yellowhammers stay close to the hedgetops, peeping out into corduroy fields on the leeward side.

In the woods atop old hazels under a thinning canopy of ash, along the lime avenue where high branches spread into the crowns, in gardens where hawthorns overhang the unworked edges – here are the robins. They have food, they have time and they have the advantage. Perhaps many of these robins will also move away, or it could be that those singing now have moved in from elsewhere.

Whether they are coming or going, they are certainly singing. Robin song is suited to cooler air, to mornings and evenings in spring and summer and the shorter day length later. It has a sharp-edged clarity, with liquid runs and etched phrases enhanced by the sounding woods. Here there is some leaf cover surrounding still, open, well-lit spaces which act as studios for the singing birds.

Robins have a reputation for ferocity with each other and a lack of fear with us. They also have a sweetness of song which reaches points where joy and melancholy merge. This is where the mood is shaped which, with the fragrance of leaf-rot and rain, fruits and earth, create what we feel as autumn.