Archive for March 2011

Toward a Pluralistic Middle East? – Jewish Ideas Daily   2 comments

A post card from the 19th century showing the ...

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Toward a Pluralistic Middle East? – Jewish Ideas Daily.As the Middle East lurches through the present confusion of civil war, revolution, and mass protest, decent people everywhere wonder about the chances of a more pluralistic and democratic order emerging. One way of measuring progress in that direction will be to track the treatment of minorities like the Berbers and the Jews.

Posted March 17, 2011 by dmacc502 in History, religion, social

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Antique stove’s versatility conquers convenience – The Boston Globe   Leave a comment

 

 

When John Buscemi talks about his dual-fuel range, he doesn’t mean one of the modern, high-end, gas cooktop-electric convection models. Buscemi’s cooker, a cast-iron Gold Medal Glenwood, is powered by gas and coal, and it was the top of the line about 100 years ago.

via Antique stove’s versatility conquers convenience – The Boston Globe.

Posted March 15, 2011 by dmacc502 in Baking, History

The Irish man who saved Hitler – Lifestyle, Frontpage – Independent.ie   Leave a comment

memorial of Oskar Schindler at the garden of S...

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Tuesday March 15 2011

There’s a memorable scene in the WWII movie Schindler’s List where grateful Jewish workers thank their Nazi boss Oskar Schindler with the words: “Whoever saves one life saves the world entire.”

But what if in saving one life you inadvertently plunged the world into the most catastrophic horror of all time? What if you saved the life of Adolf Hitler just as he was taking his first baby steps to becoming the most evil monster in history?

Carlow man Michael Keogh wrestled with that “what if” for decades up to his death in 1964. Because Keogh, from the village of Tullow, saved Hitler from being ripped apart by an ugly mob.

via The Irish man who saved Hitler – Lifestyle, Frontpage – Independent.ie.

Posted March 15, 2011 by dmacc502 in History

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Medical Advances   Leave a comment

Edward Jenner (1749-1823), Discoverer of vacci...

Image via Wikipedia Edward Jenner (1749-1823), Discoverer of vaccination.

Despite these unorthodox medical practices, the end of the 18th century was marked by many true medical innovations. British physicians William Smellie and William Hunter made advances in obstetrics that established this field as a separate branch of medicine. The British social reformer John Howard furthered humane treatment for hospital patients and prison inmates throughout Europe. In 1796 British physician Edward Jenner introduced vaccination to prevent smallpox. His efforts both controlled this dreaded disease and also established the science of immunization.

Quackery--radio155

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in History, medical

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Golden Age of Television 1930's through 1950's   2 comments

 

1936
First television broadcast made available in London.

 

It was in the years immediately preceding WWII that the television industry we know today was born. RCA‘s David Sarnoff used his company’s exhibit at the 1939 World’s Fair as a showcase for the 1st Presidential speech on television and to introduce RCA’s new line of television receivers – some of which had to be coupled with a radio if you wanted to hear sound. In addition, anybody visiting the Fair could go into the RCA pavilion and step before the cameras themselves.

The excitement about television generated by the 1939 World’s Fair carried the interest in television through WWII when development of the medium took a back seat. By the time the war was over the electronic system of television had clearly proven its greater capacity and a period of intense growth took place. Between 1945 and 1948 the number of commercial (as opposed to experimental) television stations grew from 9 to 48 and the number of cities having commercial service went from 8 to 23. And, sales of television sets increased 500%. By 1960 there were 440 commercial VHF stations, 75 UHF stations, and 85% of U.S. households had a television set.

 


 

 

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in inventions

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Pioneers   Leave a comment

Nebraska pioneer family in front of sod house with cow on roof, 1886

Nebraska pioneer family, 1886

Although the pioneers traveled to the frontier for many different reasons, they all wanted an opportunity to start new lives.  Many of the pioneers were farmers.  They went to Oregon, Texas, and other areas of the frontier for the inexpensive or even possibly free land. This land was available forhomesteading.  They wanted the rich, fertile land for their crops.  Other people came to the frontier because they had heard stories that made the new lands sound like magical places.  Some went to the frontier in order to prospect for gold, to hunt and trade fur pelts, and for many other reasons

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in farming, History

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Vietnam   Leave a comment

The Vietnam War: An Overview

The Second Indochina War, 1954-1975, grew out of the long conflict between France and Vietnam. In July 1954, after one hundred years of colonial rule, France was forced to leave Vietnam. Communist forces under the direction of General Vo Nguyen Giap defeated the allied French troops at Dien Bien Phu, a remote mountain outpost in the northwest corner of Vietnam. This decisive battle convinced the French that they could no longer maintain their Indochinese colonies and Paris quickly sued for peace. As the two sides came together to discuss the terms of the peace in Geneva, Switzerland, international events were already shaping the future of Indochina.

 

On August 2, 1964, in response to American and South Vietnamese espionage along itsBattleship firing its main guns. Photo courtesy of Soc.History.War. Vietnam Home Pagecoast, North Vietnam launched a local and controlled attack against an American ship on call in the Gulf of Tonkin. A second attack was supposed to have taken place on August 4, although Vo Nguyen Giap the DRV’s leading military figure at the time and Johnson’s Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara have recently concluded that no second attack ever took place. In any event, the Johnson administration used the August 4 attack to secure a Congressional resolution that gave the president broad war powers. The resolution, now known as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, passed both the House and Senate with only two dissenting votes (Senators Morse of Oregon and Gruening of Alaska). The Resolution was followed by limited reprisal air attacks against North Vietnam.

 

Posted March 2, 2011 by dmacc502 in History, war

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