American Cities: pre 1950, zooloo imports   Leave a comment

American Cities

63

Rear view of an “Okie’s” car, passing through Amarillo, Tex., on its way west, 1941. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

64

A huge vat of molten steel being poured into a mold at the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company, Pittsburgh, May 1942. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

65

Mounds of coal, catwalks, and barges at the Milwaukee Western Fuel Company coal docks, Dec. 1942. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

66

Aerial view of the tip of Manhattan looking like a miniature city, ca. 1942. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

67

San Francisco’s cable cars climbing the Powell Street hill, ca 1945. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

68

The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, ca.1945. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

69

Two street vendors taking time out for lunch at a makeshift table of wooden crates covered with newspaper. New York, Aug. 1946. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

70

Grandmother amusing her young companion in the waiting room of the Greyhound Bus Station, New York City, July 1947. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

71

The maze of livestock pens and walkways at Chicago’s stockyards, ca. 1947. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

72

The lion statues at the New York Public Library, with a mantle of snow during the record December 1948 snowfall. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

73

The rain-swept Boston Fish Pier, crowded with fish carts, fishing boats, and workmen, ca. 1950. (Courtesy of the National Archives)blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/22/from-the-archive-american-cities-pre-1950/2360/

October
16
,
2010KOREAN WAR 60TH ANNIVERSARY

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

1

U.S. Marines help a wounded buddy on the Naktong River front in South Korea. The war that began in Korea 60 years ago, on June 25, 1950, a ghastly conflict that killed millions and left the peninsula in ruins, became “The Forgotten War” in many American minds. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

2

Prisoners are flushed out by a U.S. patrol operating in North korea south of Kusong, Nov. 16, 1950. This is a Life Magazine Photo by Hank Walker. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

3

Two American soldiers line up a 3.5 rocket launcher bazooka along the battlefront somewhere in Korea, July 24, 1950. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

4

American GIs fire a 105 Howitzer gun in action against North Korean invaders somewhere in Korea. The war that began in Korea 60 years ago, on June 25, 1950, a ghastly conflict that killed millions and left the peninsula in ruins, became “The Forgotten War” in many American minds. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

5

U.S. Marines advance up a ridge in South Korea. The war that began in Korea 60 years ago, on June 25, 1950, a ghastly conflict that killed millions and left the peninsula in ruins, became “The Forgotten War” in many American minds. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

6

Troops of the First U.S. Cavalry Division land ashore at Pohang on the east coast of Korea during the Korean War. This is the first combat amphibious operation since World War II. The war that began in Korea 60 years ago, on June 25, 1950, a ghastly conflict that killed millions and left the peninsula in ruins, became “The Forgotten War” in many American minds. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

7

American soldiers leave the railroad station at Taejon, South Korea, en route to the battle front. The war that began in Korea 60 years ago, on June 25, 1950, a ghastly conflict that killed millions and left the peninsula in ruins, became “The Forgotten War” in many American minds. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

8

American soldiers are carried on the backs of other GI’s from Heartbreak Ridge through the rain to an aid station just behind the front lines in South Korea during the Korean War. The 2nd Division GI’s, wounded in an ambush as they came off the Ridge for a two-day rest, had spent two weeks in the line during the height of the bloody battle on the east central front. (AP Photo)

On War: Korean War 60th Anniversary

9

Residents from Pyongyang, North Korea, and refugees from other areas crawl perilously over shattered girders of the city’s bridge, as they flee south across the Taedong River to escape the advance of Chinese Communist troops. The Chinese entered the Korean War as allies of North Korea. U.S. troops battled on the side of South Korea. Begun in June 25, 1950, the war ended on July 27, 1953, with a military demarcation line set near the 38th parallel where it started. Korea remains divided. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/06/17/on-war-korean-war-60th-anniversary/2125/

October
16
,
2010
CommentShareLikeRepost | Tags: Koreawarmilitary
Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal' In June and then December - How to grow Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal' 

How Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’ looks in June and then December Photo: PHOTOLIBRARY.COM

The majestic miscanthus flutters over the garden as imperiously as the Royal Standard above Buckingham Palace. Panicums form billowing cumulus clouds.

Their tiny beaded spikelets in pink and purple shimmer and shake, picking up the colour of late-season flowers in toning shades of pink and purple.

Often the leaves of panicums can be colourful, too, and the 5ft-tall Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’ is named for its fine sheath of blue-grey foliage that remains upright from spring until autumn. The purple-pink inflorescences crown the plant as effectively as a cress haircut sprouting from an eggshell head.

It’s the contrast between the rigid, stainless-steel foliage and purple-pink froth that charms. In warm summers the foliage has some pink tones, but generally the greyer-leaved panicums stay steely as the temperatures drop.

Panicum virgatum is a common native in prairies, woodland edges, dunes and marshes in a tract of land that runs from eastern Canada down to Central America.

The drier state of California and the colder Pacific north-west get missed along the way, for this long-lived grass thrives in warm growing conditions in sun or good light. Growing preferences and form vary.

The taller blue-leaved ‘Prairie Sky’ was found by Roger Gettig, a landscape architect based at the Holden Arboretum in Ohio, growing by a Wisconsin railway. This 6ft grass can flop a little late into the year.

Despite its American provenance P. virgatum (or switch grass) was taken up by German landscapers and gardeners first.

The leaves of Karl Foerster’s ‘Rotstrahlbusch’ colour up to burgundy, but this 50-year-old grass has probably been superseded by Hans Simon’s shorter ‘Shenandoah’. This has the best burgundy-wine leaves in autumn, averaging 4ft.

‘Rehbraun’ (red-brown) was selected by Hänse Herms for its rusty foliage and it’s a similar height. ‘Hänse Herms’ is similar.

More recently Kurt Bluemel, a nurseryman and landscape designer from Maryland in the US, who is often dubbed the king of the grasses, has selected three.

They include the already mentioned ‘Heavy Metal’. His other two are ‘Squaw’ and ‘Warrior’. The 4ft-tall ‘Squaw’ has strong pink inflorescences that emerge through green foliage.

Leaves develop red-purple tones in September. The taller ‘Warrior’ (6ft) has green leaves and pink-red panicles. All are widely available, but ‘Squaw’ is often considered the better of the two.

When choosing, consider the heights (which can vary between 3ft and 6ft) and then decide if you want foliage colour or flowery inflorescence.

If you opt for foliage, give your grass space to shine. If it’s frothy pink-purple flowers you’re after, drift several together among late-season perennials.

Growing tips

Those in warmer parts of Britain will do best with Panicum virgatum because it thrives on cold winters followed by warm summers. Given these conditions, panicums will flower by early September.

Plant in full sun so that the soil warms up as quickly as possible. Water in the early stages of growth because panicums enjoy fertile, moist soil. They are not plants for a dry, hot spot. Divide in spring, just as growth starts.

The heads are small and intricate, so to create an effect panicums should be planted in drifts. Leave 2½ft between plants.

Most panicums will be planted in autumn, when they catch the gardener’s eye. Prepare the ground well and dig a larger hole (about twice the size) and incorporate organic matter so the plant isn’t sitting in a wet sump.

Good companions

Knoll Gardens, at Wimborne in Dorset, uses drifts of panicums with later-flowering echinaceas in sunset shades. The best custard-toned echinacea is ‘Harvest Moon’, and the bead-like panicles of the panicum pick up the bronzed cones perfectly.

The pink-purple awns can also be used to pick up other plummy-toned grasses such as Miscanthus sinensis ‘Ferner Osten’ and ‘Flamingo’. The addition of a wine-leaved shrub unites the scheme.

The bluer-toned leaves of ‘Heavy Metal’ can be used with tall yellow daisies (such as Rudbeckia laciniata ‘Herbstonne’) and choice goldenrods including Solidago rugosa ‘Fireworks’.www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/howtogrow/8048285/How-to-grow-Panicum-virgatum-Heavy-Metal.html

October
15
,
2010
CommentShareLikeRepost | Tags: gardeningfoliagegrasses,

Posted October 20, 2010 by dmacc502 in Uncategorized

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