American Cities: pre 1950, zooloo imports   Leave a comment

American Cities

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Shells of the buildings of Richmond, Va., silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates, 1865. Mathew Brady collection. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

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Store-lined street, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1869. Photograph by William H. Jackson. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

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Panorama of Helena, Mont., in 1870. Photograph by William H. Jackson. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

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The weatherbeaten wharves between Piety and Desire Streets, New Orleans, La., August 1881. A group of men seated on the wharves, store-lined street in the background. (Courtesy of the National Archives)

American Cities

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Bearded Irish clam diggers and a matronly companion on a wharf in Boston, 1882. (Courtesy of the National Archives)blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/22/from-the-archive-american-cities-pre-1950/2360/

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2010
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news.discovery.com/animals/butterflies-cure-themselves-of-disease-by-using-medicinal-plants.html#mkcpgn=emnws1 Analysis by Jennifer Viegas
Fri Oct 8, 2010 Monarch butterflies can cure themselves and their offspring of disease by using medicinal plants, according to a new paper in the journal Ecology Letters.

The disease is caused by a protozoan parasite called Ophryocystis elektroscirrha. The parasite invades the gut of the caterpillars and then persists when the caterpillars become adult monarchs.

Project leader Jaap de Roode in eScience Commons today said, “We have shown that some species of milkweed, the larva’s food plants, can reduce parasite infection in the monarchs. And we have also found that infected female butterflies prefer to lay their eggs on plants that will make their offspring less sick, suggesting that monarchs have evolved the ability to medicate their offspring.”

(Images: Jaap de Roode and Lisa Sharling)

Monarch caterpillar

Caterpillar

Adult monarch butterfly

Female-monarch

De Roode, assistant professor of biology at Emory University, said, ““We believe that our experiments provide the best evidence to date that animals use medication.”

Jaap de Roode, who discusses his latest findings in this video

Jaap-crop

At Discovery News, we’ve touched on the topic before for other species. Spider monkeys, for example, are thought to have discovered a medicated body scratcher. But there are relatively few such studies on self-medication by animals.

(A sick monarch butterfly dying from the parasite)

A sick monarch stuck to its chrysalis

In this case, there’s added interest because the behavior is enacted by a creature that, despite its beauty, is fairly low on the food chain. Plus, the behavior is trans-generational, says Thierry Lefevre, a post-doctoral fellow in de Roode’s lab. “While the mother is expressing the behavior, only her offspring benefit.”

Health-related decisions made by non-human species could also potentially benefit us in future. For example, researchers like chemical ecologist Mark Hunter have been studying milkweed plants to determine their medicinal properties.BUTTERFLIES CURE THEMSELVES WITH PLANTS

October
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2010
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08/10/2010

Accidental Moscow dad: One year as an expat

Blogger Justin M. has been an expat in Russia for one year, yet still struggles to find comfort, familiarity, and overall content as a dad and expat in Moscow.We have been here for one year now. We arrived in September, experienced a very cold, freak winter, a move to a new flat and a new city.

We experienced a freak baking summer with choking smoke and terrorist bombs on the metro, the death of our family cat when he fell from the window and a new life for me as a stay-at-home dad.

Time is a funny thing when you are in a situation you do not enjoy. Days seem like months and months seem like years; the clock ticks slowly by.

Moscow is a strange place: big, bold and dirty. Huge tower block flats stretch as far as the eye can see when you arrive by plane looking down on the Moscow region from your armchair in the sky. Roads are huge with four to five lanes in each direction.

The roads are chocked with cars: People drive top-of-the-range cars with blacked-out windows but crawl along the roads at a snails pace. They’re stuck in traffic, all in a hurry and all with a mission.

People walk the streets in a hurry, and men spit and blow their noses on the floor. You must walk with your eyes on the ground to avoid walking on these bodily deposits.

Flat prices are crazy; you get very little for your money and the quality is poor. They advertise flats being “western standard”, when in fact the standard is normal to poor.

Russian police stand about on the streets with fat guts, shirt buttons undone, fag in mouth, hat tipped back at an angle and looking to take your money for any offense (real or imagined) if your skin is dark or brown.

Supermarkets are packed and stressful experiences.

The expat community is large and varied. There are many Americans here, as well as other nationalities all living in their own areas and communities all here on an agenda. Many are on large-pay packages with all the benefits that go with it: free rent, free medical cover, free childcare, free schooling.

Moscow really is another planet, and do not come here with expectations. And always expect the unexpected. Love it or hate it. I am still searching for the positive here, and have not yet found it, but I will keep looking under every rock and in every possibility.

Try not to let depression get to you if you are stuck at home. Depression can eat you alive and swallow you up without mercy. Make friends and get out. Take regular breaks out of Russia; you will need to as often as possible.

A year in Moscow has been a long trip for me dear reader, I hope the next one goes faster.

Justin M. / Expatica

Flickr photos: ArgenbergEd Yourdon

The writer is a British expat who moved to Moscow in September 2009. He is married with a son who was born in Slovakia. Justin and his wife lived abroad for over six years, first moving to Slovakia and now Russia. Before they became an expat family, he was an IT manager in London. He now spends his time as a full-time stay at home dad looking after junior, writing and sightseeing. His blog is www.englishdadinmoscow.com.www.expatica.ru/lifestyle_leisure/blogs_photos/Accidental-Moscow-dad-One-year-as-an-expat.html

October
11
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2010
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Service towers move away from the Russian Soyuz TMA-01M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Kaleri and Oleg Skripochka, a few minutes before blast off at the Baikonur cosmodrome October 8, 2010. Picture taken using long exposure. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov 

Service towers move away from the Russian Soyuz TMA-01M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Kaleri and Oleg Skripochka, a few minutes before blast off at the Baikonur cosmodrome October 8, 2010. Picture taken using long exposure.

Credit: Reuters/Shamil Zhumatov

MOSCOW | Sun Oct 10, 2010 2:04pm EDT

(Reuters) – A Russian spacecraft carrying two cosmonauts and a U.S. astronaut to the international space station lifted off early on Friday from Russia’s launch site in Kazakhstan.

Alexander Kaleri, Oleg Skripochka and Scott Kelly are to join three other crew members on the orbital station after a two-day trip from Earth aboard the Soyuz TMA-01M, an upgraded model of a Soviet-designed standby.

In live footage on Russian state television, the rocket blasted off on schedule at 0511 local time (2311 GMT Thursday) from its launch pad at the Baikonur facility.

“Everything is in order on board,” veteran cosmonaut Kaleri, strapped in with his two crewmates, reported to Russian Mission Control a few minutes into the flight as rocket stages dropped off. The craft soon entered orbit.

“I wish you every success,” Russian space agency chief Anatoly Perminov told the crew.

Kaleri is on his fifth space flight and Skripochka his first. Kelly has visited the international space station twice on U.S. shuttle missions.

They are to spend six months aboard the station, a $100 billion project of 16 nations that has been under construction about 220 miles above Earth since 1998.

The growing orbital complex, a mix of mostly Russian and American-built modules, can now accommodate a six-member crew at all times. Cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and NASA astronauts Doug Wheelock and Shannon Walker have been aboard since June.

Construction of the orbital outpost will be finished following U.S. space shuttle missions in November and February. Single-use Soyuz craft will have to ferry all crews to the station after the U.S. space agency NASA retires its shuttle fleet next year.

(Reporting by Steve Gutterman; editing by David Stamp)www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6965Q020101010

October
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2010
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Built in drydock in 1843 by the Great Western SS Co., Bristol for their own company, she was a 3,270 gross ton ship, length 289ft x beam 50ft, clipper stem, one funnel, six masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 360-1st class only.

Floated on 19 July 1843, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 26 July 1845 (arr.10 August, dep. 30 August). She arrived back at Liverpool on 15 September 1845. In 1846 she was fitted with bilge keels to minimise rolling, her six-bladed propellors replaced by four-bladed ones and her masts reduced to five. On 9 May 1846 she commenced her first voyage after alterations when she left Liverpool for New York. On 22 September 1846 she started on her fifth voyage but grounded in Dundrum Bay, Co Down, Ireland and was not salvaged until August 1847 when she was towed to Liverpool. In December 1850 she was sold to Gibbs, Bright & Co., reconditioned, fitted with new engines, two funnels athwartships, four masts and accommodation for 50-1st and 680-3rd class passengers. She started a single round voyage between Liverpool and New York on 1 May 1852 and on 18 August 1852 commenced sailings between Liverpool and Australia. On 28 July 1858 she made another single Liverpool – New York sailing and in February 1876 was laid up at Birkenhead at the conclusion of her 32nd round voyage to Australia.

Sold in 1882, her engines were removed and she was converted to a three masted sailing ship. In 1886 she became a coal and wool hulk in the Falkland Islands until 1933. In 1937 she was beached at Sparrow Cove and in 1970 was refloated, placed on floating pontoons and towed to Bristol. She has now been completely restored as a tribute to her designer – Brunel – and is open to the public. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.66] Contributed by Ted Finch

great britain

voyage advertisement

life on board picture
Life on board during an 1863 voyage, as captured by Herman Zumstein, a passenger who worked in Melbourne as a silk merchant.

SS Great Britain’s Australian Voyages

Outward (Liverpool-Melbourne)www.theshipslist.com/pictures/Greatbritain.htm

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2010
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The Hercules carried emigrants assisted by the Highlands & Islands Emigration Society, which arranged for the emigration of more than 4,000 persons to Australia between 1852-1854 . .list of passengers who arrived at Adelaide July 26th 1853.

HMS Hercules

Emigration from the Isle of Skye “The Hercules” leaving the harbour of Campbeltownwww.theshipslist.com/pictures/hercules.htm

South Australian Register Wednesday 27 July 1853

Tuesday July 26:— H.M.S. Hercules, Baynton, Commander, from Cork April 14 — and Cape of Good Hope June 21 with 375 Government Emigrants, Edward Nolloth Surgeon-superintendent. Wednesday 27 July:— Names of emigrants per H.M.S. Hercules for Adelaide, arrival reported yesterday……..adult deaths:—Ann Maclean, Christina McAskill. One hundred and ninety souls to land. —8th ship from England to S.A. with government passengers for 1853 ; one birth and two deaths on the passage, Edward Nolloth, surgeon-superintendent.

The South Australian Government Gazette 1866 p. 83
Name Age Date of Death Cause of Death Where buried
McLean, Ann 30 no record no record at sea

note: where maiden name of wife is indicated, it has been included in the given name column within ( ) ; the passenger list comprises three sections arranged alphabetically, i families, ii single men, iii single women & children ; transcriber notes in italics ; some single people are listed on the “single” list and with their families, so be aware of duplication.

Names Age Occupation B-index Birthplace Remarks
Last Given
Families
Brooks James 23 Miner / Sapper Bernisdale, Snizort not an emigrant of the H.I.E. Society
Ann 24
Joseph 6
Elizabeth 2
Walter inf
Campbell Charles 40 231/3 Cluer, Harris
Marion (McLeod) 40
Donald 8
Margaret 5
Campbell John 40 Shepherd 232/3 Finsbay, Harris (McDonald ?)
Mary 40
Donald 14
Christy 12
Mary 9
Angus 6
Margaret 2
male inf born at sea
Campbell Roderick 48 Shepherd 233/2 Lichisto, Harris
Flora 48
Ann 23 with parents
Angus 20 with parents
Hannah 18 with parents
John 16 Shepherd with parents
Donald 14 Shepherd with parents
Finlay 10
Donald 7
Cunningham Norman 51 Shepherd 358/2 Cuidinish, Harris
Effy (McLeod) 40 Hutkeeper
Ann 18 Hutkeeper with parents
Charles 17 Shepherd with parents
Donald 14 Shepherd with parents
Marion 12 Hutkeeper
Donald 9
Mary 5
Marion 2
Evans Thomas 30 Miner / Sapper 476/1 Bernisdale, Snizort not an emigrant of the H.I.E. Society
Margaret 30
William 5
Thomas 1
Ferguson Angus 27 Shepherd Balemore, N. Uist
Janet 19
Harrison John 33 Shepherd not an emigrant of the H.I.E. Society
Isabella 33
Nora 7
Harrison Peter 26 Shepherd not an emigrant of the H.I.E. Society
Marion 26
Donald 2
Allan inf
McAskill Allan 34 Shepherd 1049/1 Loch Eport, N. Uist Did not sail on Hercules, see Calabar | (son of Donald 60 and Christy 57)
Marion 30
Archibald 1
Donald 3
McAskill Allan 32 Shepherd 1049/1 Langass, N. Uist
Christina 26
Malcolm inf
McAskill Angus 44 Farm Labourer 1049/1 Diraclett, Harris
Christina 30 died at sea, 22nd July 1853
Effy 2
Ann 1
McAskill Donald 60 Shepherd 1049/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Christy 57
John 24 with parents
Mary 22 with parents
Malcolm 19 Shepherd with parents
Donald 15 Shepherd with parents
Alexander 14 Shepherd with parents
McDiarmid John 34 Shepherd 1058/1 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Catherine 28
Donald inf
McDonald Allan 58 1058/2 Langass, N. Uist
Ann 44
Donald 26 with parents
Catherine 17 with parents
Archibald 14 with parents
Ann 15 with parents
Margaret 8
John 5
Archibald 3
McDonald Allan 27 Shepherd 1058/2 Langass, N. Uist
Margaret 25
Catherine inf
McDonald Archibald 58 1058/3 ??
Christy 10 ??
McDonald Evander / Evadne 26 Shepherd Geocrab, Harris
Marion (McCaskill) 25
Christy 3
Kenneth 1
McDonald Donald 39 1059/1 Hougharry, N. Uist
Christy 35
Rory 6
Alexander 3
Norman 1
McDonald James 21 Loch Eport, N. Uist stowaway ; son-in-law of Donald MacAskill
Margaret (McAskill) 22
McDonald John 30 1060/2 Tigharry, N. Uist son of Archibald, 58
Mary 20
McDonald Murdoch 40 1061/1 Tigharry, N. Uist
Mary 25 died 7 Feb 1853
Catherine 6
Christy 4
Margaret 2
Donald inf died 14 Feb 1853
McInnes Ewen 57 Shepherd 1070/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Marion (McAskill) 54
Rory 20 with parents
Catherine 25 with parents
Janet 21 with parents
Marion 18 sailed on Neptune
Christy 15 with parents
Malcolm 13
Archibald 11
McKay Neil 34 1072/1 Baleloch, N. Uist Baleshare ?
Peggy 26
Margaret 3
Ewen 1 Steven ?
McKinnon Malcolm 44 Labourer 996/1 Strond, Harris Mackinnon
Ann 40
Norman 20
John 17
Murdoch 13
Rory 10
McKinnon Murdoch 27 Labourer 996/1 Cluer, Harris Mackinnon
Mary 35
Christina 5
Mary 2
McKinnon Archibald 22 1075/3 Carinish, N. Uist
Ann (McBain) 20
McLean Archibald 37 Farm Labourer 1077/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Ann 30 died at sea, 25th May 1853
Neil 12
Ann 7
Christy 2
Hector 1
McLeod Alexander 58 Shepherd 1079/1 Ardvey, Harris
Mary 54
Rory 21 Shepherd 1080/1 Roderick
Neil 16 Shepherd 1080/1
McLeod John 27 Shepherd 1079/3 Strond, Harris rest of his family sailed on Neptune
Lexy 17 Hutkeeper
McLeod Isabella 12 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – sister of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
Ann 12 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – sister of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
John 10 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – brother of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
McPhail Angus 41 Farmer 1085/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Margaret 32
Christy 10
Catherine 8
John 4
Finlay 1
McPhail Donald 40 Shepherd 1085/2 Langass, N. Uist
Marion 38
Alexander 14
Christy inf
McQueen Norman 52 1086/3 Illeray, N. Uist
Rachel 50
Mary 26 with parents
Effy 24 with parents –
& son born July 24 1853
Donald 19 with parents
Alexander 17 with parents
Duncan 15 with parents
Ewen 9
McVicar Donald 41 1088/1 Hosta, N. Uist
Mary 39
Neil 20
Margaret 18
Norman 13
Donald 11
James 8
Catherine 4
Charlotte 2
McVicar Neil 30 1088/1 Balelone, N. Uist
Mary (McLeod) 22
Kenneth 1
Monk Archibald 65 Shepherd 1127/3 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Catherine 67
Mary 20 with parents
Margaret (Mary) 16 with parents
Ann 3 daughter of John & Mary Monk
Monk John 28 Loch Eport, N. Uist died 14th Feb 1853
Mary 30 widow of John – died 17th Feb 1853
Ann 3 see above
Archibald inf died 23rd Feb 1853
Morrison John 33 Labourer 1136/3 Kyles Stockinish, Harris
Isabella (McLeod) 33
Nora 7
Names Age Occupation B-index Birthplace Remarks
Last Given
Single Men
Campbell Angus 19 231/2 Lichisto, Harris with parents
Campbell Donald 14 231/3 Lichisto, Harris with parents
Campbell Donald 14 233/2 Finsbay, Harris with parents
Campbell John 15 Shepherd 232/3 Lichisto, Harris
McAskill Donald 18 Shepherd 1049/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist with parents
McAskill John 24 1049/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist with parents
McAskill Malcolm 19 1049/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist with parents
McDonald Donald
McDonald Donald
McDonald Donald
McDonald Ronald 14 Tigharry, N. Uist son of Archibald, 58
McLean Alexander 16 1077/2 Loch Eport, N. Uist rest of family sailed on Neptune
McLeod Alexander 26 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McLeod John 10 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – brother of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
McLeod Malcolm 23 1079/3 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McLeod Murdoch 28 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McLeod Neil 16 Shepherd 1080/1 Ardvey, Harris
McLeod Rory 21 Shepherd 1080/1 Ardvey, Harris
McPhail Malcolm 21 Langass, N. Uist brother of Donald
McPhail Roderick 36 Langass, N. Uist died 31st January 1853 – brother of Donald
McQueen Alexander 17 Illeray, N. Uist
McQueen Donald 19 1086/3 Illeray, N. Uist
McQueen Duncan 15 Illeray, N. Uist
McVicar Neil 20 Hosta, N. Uist
Single Women
Campbell Ann 23 Lichisto, Harris with parents
Campbell Hannah 18 Lichisto, Harris with parents
Cunningham Ann 18 Cuidinish, Harris with parents
Laing Margaret 17 Balemore, N. Uist rest of family sailed on Olivia
McAskill Jane 14 Loch Eport, N. Uist two other sisters sailed on Neptune, rest of family sailed on Calabar
McAskill Marion 19 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McBain Ann 20 Baleshare, N. Uist sister & sister-in-law sailed on Neptune, rest of family sailed on Olivia
McBain Catherine 18 Baleshare, N. Uist
McDonald Ann 28 Tigharry, N. Uist daughter of Archibald, 58
McDonald Barbara 18 Claddich, N.Uist
McDonald Catherine 22 Tigharry, N. Uist daughter of Archibald, 58
McDonald Catherine
McDonald Catherine
McDonald Christy 10 Tigharry, N. Uist daughter of Archibald, 58
McDonald Flora 19 Langass, N. Uist neice of Allan McDonald, 58
McDonald Margaret
McDougall Christy 19 Hougharry, N. Uist
McInnes Catherine 25 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McInnes Christy 16 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McInnes Janet 21 Loch Eport, N. Uist
McKinnon Christy 20 Cluer, Harris neice of Malcolm Mackinnon
McKinnon Effy 47 Kindulavaig, Harris
McKinnon Marion 22 Cluer, Harris neice of Malcolm Mackinnon
McKinnon Mary 17 Kindulavaig, Harris
McLeod Ann 24 Domestic Servant Loch Eport, N. Uist
McLeod Catherine 18 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – sister of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
McLeod Isabella 12 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – sister of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod
McLeod Marion 20 Farm Servant Loch Eport, N. Uist
McLeod Marion 20
McPhail Ann 18 Langass, N. Uist sister of Donald
McQueen
McVicar / McLeod Margaret 26 Balelone, N. Uist orphan – sister of Mary McVicar neeMcLeod ?
Monk Mary 20 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Monk Mary 16 Loch Eport, N. Uist
Morrison Catherine 24 Langass, N. Uist died 22 Feb.1853 –
sister-in-law of Allan McDonald, 27

Sources: State Library South Australia, official passenger lists, mainly of immigrants arriving in South Australia under United Kingdom assisted passage schemes, 1847-1886 GRG 35/48a (formely ACC 313); Sydney Shipping Gazette; South Australian Register; The South Australian Government Gazette; Biographical index SA 1836-1885 (the B-index column indicates individuals who may be found in that index, with corresponding reference number for further research)

October
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2010

picture of Berlin

The BERLIN, 1745 tons, was built by Earle’s Shipbuilding, Hull, in 1894 for the Harwich – Hook of Holland Service.

On 21st Feb. 1907 she was swept across the northern mole at the entrance to the New Waterway in a fierce gale. Her bows broke off and sank, but her stern portion remained fast to the breakwater. Despite rescue attempts, only 10 passengers and 5 crew were saved and the loss of 128 lives made this the worst peacetime disaster in North Sea passenger travel.

[Contributed by Ted Finch]www.theshipslist.com/pictures/berlin.htm

October
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2010
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Autumn scenes slideshow

Ann Bales looks at the dazzling display of autumn red leaves from a Virginia creeper spreading across the front of her guest house in the centre of Middleham, North Yorkshire

Picture: NORTH NEWSwww.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthpicturegalleries/8050936/Autumn-colours-leaves-across-Britain-begin-to-turn-orange-and-red.html

Posted October 20, 2010 by dmacc502 in Uncategorized

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